Tag Archives: gender and sexuality

History of Sexuality Reminar 2017-18

Have a look at the fantastic 2017-18 programme of the History of Sexuality Seminar at the IHR. Apart from the two public lectures, no booking is required.  Just turn up on the day.

SEMINAR SERIES IN THE HISTORY OF SEXUALITY 

INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH

2017-18 PROGRAMME

convened by the Raphael Samuel History Centre

All seminars take place in the Pollard Seminar Room N301, unless otherwise stated. The Pollard Room is on the third floor of the main IHR building in Senate House.

Tuesday 10 October 5.15pm 

The Mythical Sexuality of La Goulue and La Casati

Will Visconti (University of Sydney)

Tuesday 7 November 5.15pm

Redefining “Normal” Child Sexuality: Encounters between Sexologists and Psychoanalysts at the fin de siècle

Katie Sutton (Australian National University)

Wednesday 29 November 6.00pm

Turing in Context: Sexual Offences in Cheshire in the 1950s [public lecture]

Chris Waters (Williams College)

NB: this public lecture takes place at the Clore Lecture Theatre, Birkbeck College, Torrington Square, and is part of the one-day conference Queer Lives Past and Present: Interrogating the Legal.  (www.raphael-samuel.org.uk/interrogating-the-legal/ )

Thursday 30 November, 2.00pm 

“The Prairies- Coming Out Strong”: Western Canadian Queer Communities, 1969-1985  [public lecture]

Valerie Korinek (University of Saskatchewan)

NB: this public lecture takes place at the Clore Lecture Theatre, Birkbeck College, Torrington Square, and is part of the Queer Localities conference (queerbeyondlondon.com/conference/)

Tuesday 5 December 5.15pm 

Rethinking Homology and Analogy of the Sexes in the Historiography of Sexuality

Alison Moore (Western Sydney University)

Tuesday 16 January 5.15pm

Wet-nurses, sexual restrictions and wage labour in Roman Egypt

April Pudsey (Manchester Metropolitan University)

Tuesday 13 February 5.15pm 

Lesbian Domesticities: Material structures of same-sex intimacy in post-war Britain and Australia

Rebecca Jennings (UCL)

Tuesday 13 March 5.15pm 

Rethinking sexual geography: ‘sexuality’ and European identity, c. 1550-1700

Nailya Shamgunova (University of Cambridge)

Tuesday 15 May 5.15pm

Purring Vaginas and Waggling Penises:  Sexting World War One

Nancy Christie (McMaster University)

Tuesday 12 June 5.15pm

The Discovery of Pleasure: Female Sexuality in Italy and West Germany in the long 1970s

Fiametta Balestracci (Queen Mary)

Convenors: Chiara Beccalossi (University of Lincoln), Alison Oram (Leeds Beckett University), Craig Griffiths (Manchester Metropolitan University), Christopher M. Waters (Williams University), Heike Bauer (Birkbeck), Jana Funke (University of Exeter), Julia Laite (Birkbeck), Jane Mackelworth (Queen Mary), Justin Bengry (Goldsmiths), Claire Hayward (Kingston University), Matt Cook (Birkbeck), Sean Brady (Birkbeck), Sarah Toulalan (University of Exeter), Daniel Callwood (Queen Mary), Katherine Harvey (Birkbeck), Tommy Dickinson (King’s College London), Janet Weston (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine), Daniel Orrells (King’s College London).

http://www.history.ac.uk/events/seminar/history-sexuality

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Precious Critical Time: A Workshop on Violence in Queer & Trans Lives

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As part of my AHRC Fellowship, I hosted a workshop yesterday on ‘Violence in Queer and Trans Lives: A Dialogue between the Humanities and Health Professions’. Following on from Homophobia Rewritten, a thought-provoking symposium I had organised earlier in the summer, this workshop brought into conversation diverse gender and sexuality scholars and professionals whose work focuses on the difficult, and frequently violent, experiences of people whose bodies and desires do not conform to narrow socio-cultural norms and expectations.

Unlike Homophobia Rewritten, which featured formal paper presentations on the literary and cultural representations of, and responses, to homophobia, the format of this workshop was more open. In line with the event’s main aim – to facilitate explorative conversations between experts who do not normally find themselves in dialogue with each other – the number of invited contributors was deliberately small.

Next to me – I’m a senior lecturer in English & Humanities at Birkbeck currently working on a project that explores how violence shaped the emergence of modern sexual identities and subcultures – the participants included: Monalesia Earle, a social worker and PhD student working with me on a thesis about contemporary queer women of colour representation; Peter Hegarty, professor of psycholoIMG_2656gy at the University of Surrey with special interests in gender and sexuality, and Katherine Hubbard, a PhD student working with Peter on a project about Rorschach tests and the ‘hidden’ homophobic history of psychology; Churnjeet Mahn, a literary scholar from Surrey’s English Department and former collaborator of mine on Transnational Lesbian Cultures, who is now working on an AHRC funded project with young queer refugees, and Vernon Rosario, a UCLA-based clinical psychiatrist  – and trained historian of medicine – with special interest in trans, intersex and issues of gender and sexuality more broadly.

Critical Conversations

It was a privilege to have Vernon in our middle. His experience with children and adolescents who feel in need of medical help because of their gender – or are send to him by parents who think that such help is needed – provided important insights into the everyday realties and difficulties faced by some of the young people whose bodies and desires may be the subject of much social and critical scrutiny, but who do not (yet) take part in these debates.

Much of our discussion focused on how ideas become truths and how to challenge rarefied misconceptions about what science knows about bodies. We argued about the relationship between ‘discourse’ and ‘experience’, ‘theory’ and ‘everyday reality’, and agreed, broadly, about the need for stronger links – new bridges of intelligibility – between the humanities, social sciences and medical practice.

I came away energised and full of new ideas, and with plans to build on the links forged during this event. But it also made me acutely aware of what a rare opportunity it has become in UK Higher Education to be able to engage in critical group conversations that neither revolve around the presentation of polished existing research nor work towards producing a specific new outcome. Yet such speculative debates, and dialogue across fields, are absolutely vital to academic work: for transformative research is never forged in isolation.

8 October 2014. Thanks to the AHRC for funding this event, and to the School of English and Languages at the University of Surrey for providing the venue.